Over the past few months, our motto at St George’s Battery Point has been: ‘Our building is closed but our hearts are open’. Our focus has been on keeping people connected with each other and connected with God.

When Covid-19 restrictions came into effect so suddenly, we all continued to connect through a virtual morning tea each Sunday. Our rector, Victor, asked us: What spoke to you from the diocesan online church service? What can you give thanks for? What has been challenging? And, how can you serve your neighbours this week? After Easter we began our own services on Zoom.

In response to serving my neighbours, my story includes a friend from church arranged her bear, Tassie tiger and kangaroo in my front window. These and her felt bunnies strung along my fence are loved by passing children.

I gave homemade truffles to the stonemasons who kept working on our church and neighbours appreciated strawberries dipped in coloured chocolate and an Easter card.

A former parishioner and I used to prepare a meal and dine together at her home. The leftovers gave us both two additional meals. During lock down we have continued to cook every week via Zoom and enjoy sharing a meal almost as much as in person. However, we have five leftover meals each!

Our church normally asks our local community to support the annual Floodlighting of the Tower appeal. After prayer, this was an inspired opportunity to deliver a pastoral care letter to every household in the parish. Unexpectedly we’ve received many donations and notes of appreciation, especially of Victor ringing the church bell at midday every day inviting everyone to pray. People say this is a great comfort to them at this time.

Anne Brown, St George’s Battery Point

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